Blog Archives

CNBC/Survey Monkey Poll Reveals Small Business Vulnerability to Cyberattack

Protection concept. Protect mechanism, system privacy.

“Hackers have breached half of the 28 millionscreen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am small businesses in the United States, according to the 2016 State of SMB Cybersecurity Report,” says a recently-released CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey article about cyber security.

Through a survey of 2,000 small business owners across the nation conducted in April, the CNBC/Survey Monkey team found that only two percent of small business owners surveyed saw cyber security as “the most critical issue they face.”

Many business owners are more concerned about personnel, competition or benefits issues, but the resulting lack of focus on cyber security, combined with an attitude of ‘we’re too small to be targeted,’ may make these businesses more vulnerable to cyberattack, the article stated.

The article also cited Hemu Nigam, founder of SSP Blue, an internet security consulting business, and the former vice president of internet enforcement at the Motion Picture Association of America, who said, “Hackers love small businesses [because] they don’t have the resources to put in high-end cybersecurity protection and they may not be consciously aware they are a target.”

The cost of not having a high-end cybersecurity protection system can be high as well. For a retailer, a credit card data breach can range from “$200 per transaction to $395 per transaction” to respond adequately to the breach, according to the report.

Cyberattacks against businesses can come in many forms (we suggest reading through our blog archives to learn more about these types of attacks and defensive steps to take). The CNBC/SurveyMonkey article’s authors recommend the following precautionary measures:

  • Use large service providers like WordPress and Gmail for your company’s website and email since they already have complex protection systems built in.
  • Refrain from checking personal accounts from a company computer.
  • Use a cloud-based service rather than keeping your information local.

For more cybersecurity tips, please check out our blog post “Nine Tips for Better Cybersecurity” and “Cybersecurity Best Practices” on our website.

More information about the CNBC/Survey Monkey Small Business Survey can be found at the CNBC web page on the tech/cybersecurity page.

(Promoting cybersecurity best practices, Regents Bank recommends against clicking links provided by second-hand parties and chooses instead to provide written directions about how to find material we reference on our blog.)

screen-shot-2016-09-28-at-7-28-21-pm_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am Linking to Non-Regents Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Regents Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Regents Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Regents Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.

fbtwitterLinkedIngp

Cyber security alert … There are only two kinds, which one are you?

cyber

Thank you to article author Linda Drake of Trailblazer Advisors and to Inside Tucson Business for allowing us to republish this article on our blog.

A common meme in the imploding industry of information security is the assertion that there are only two kinds of companies:

Those that have been hacked and those who don’t know they’ve been hacked!

Which one are you?

There are some stunning statistics* that every small and medium-sized business should know that require your attention and action for your protection.

No business or organization can prevent data breaches. A single credit card data breach can cost your business $217 per incident

According to experts, the cost of a company-wide data breach costs a minimum of $10,000

92 percent of companies experiencing a breach did not know it (they were notified by a 3rd party)

75 percent of breaches occur in businesses with less than 100 employees.

Only 25 percent of breaches are IT or hacker-related; this means 75 percent of breach events are related to current/former employees, customers, vendors, contractors and organized crime or social engineering.

Yet, 83 percent of SMB’s do not have a formal cybersecurity plan.

Most importantly, 64 percent of companies with 500 or fewer employees go out of business within a year of being hacked!

If the last statement does not compel you to take action, close your business down now!

The age of the ‘Internet of Everything’ is upon us. Companies need to harness this technology as an asset or potentially endure irreparable harm.  According to Gartner Research, companies incur four times the expense to respond to data breach events than the installation of appropriate security technology to prevent it.  Of course, the actual expense of a breach does not include the correspondent frustration, aggravation and untold embarrassment.

As a business owner you may be asking yourself, am I really at risk?  “Indeed, you really are!” retorted Kathy Delaney Winger, Esq., an attorney who practices in the area of cybersecurity.   “All companies must protect ‘Personally Identifiable Information,’ commonly termed (PII).” PII can be defined as any information about an individual maintained by an agency, including (1) any information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity, such as name, social security number, date and place of birth, mother’s maiden name, or biometric records; and (2) any other information that is linked or linkable to an individual, such as medical, educational, financial, and employment information.”

“The truth is,” stated Kathy, “the definition of information is very broad, as is your obligation to protect it.  For example, even if a business owner hires a third party to perform services that involve the use of PII (such as payroll processors) the business owner may still be at risk if a breach occurs.”

According to Kathy, there are multiple factors that you should consider when thinking about cybersecurity and protecting your business.  “It’s critically important to be aware of the PII that your business is collecting, holding and/or sharing with third parties,” said Kathy.  “Once you’ve made yourself aware of it, you should take steps to protect the information and have a plan as to how you will handle matters (such as complying with your obligation to notify affected parties) in the event of a breach.”  Kathy recommends that business owners work closely with professionals who are knowledgeable in this area, including lawyers and companies that specialize in computer security.  According to Kathy, businesses should also discuss the issue with insurance professionals.  “I recommend that business owners consider purchasing cyber insurance that will protect the company should a breach occur,” said Kathy.  She continued “the statistics cited at the start of this article illustrate that, once a breach occurs, a company’s liability can be extensive.  Thus, business owners are well advised to insure against data breach losses just as they insure against many other kinds of losses.”

According to James Riley, CEO of JNR Networks, the number one technology virus is the user!  Most systems are compromised by users who knowingly or unknowingly create the vulnerability of access to your data.

So what steps should you take to protect your data and your company?

The first, most immediate action is modifying the approach to passwords.  Some IT experts suggest that you should treat passwords like underwear: don’t leave them where people can see them, change them often, do not lend them to others, and make sure they are a good “fit”. Further, the obfuscation of passwords is critical.

“Passwords should not include the obvious,” James suggests.  “Do not use passwords with your kids’ names, spouse, pets or anything that people know about you,” James commented. Passwords should be at least 8 characters that include upper and lower case, numbers and symbols.  The key to a unique and memorable password is the linking and twisting of terms that only have meaning to you.  “Spell words that are jumbled and have no relationship to each other, just to you.”

Beyond the password basics, James added, “All companies need at the very minimum, business grade (BG) antivirus software, BG firewalls, and BG equipment. But, all the best of these tools are nothing without the development of Acceptable Use Policies (AUP) that are established, reinforced and enforced in each company.”

One of our country’s greatest founding fathers had it right—

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

In the 18th century Ben Franklin had no idea that his words would be so applicable in this era coined, “The Third Wave of the Internet,” by AOL’s founder, Steve Case. The SMB bottom-line regarding cybersecurity is a simple message: explore, embrace, manage and, above all, control cyber technology before it controls you.

*Statistics presented by a panel of experts for AZ Tech Council at the recent Tech Junction Conference in Tucson.  Kathy Delaney Winger, Esq. of The Law Offices of Kathy Delaney Winger and James Riley, CEO of JNR Networks were two of the panelists.

Linda Drake is a 25 year, seasoned global entrepreneur, corporate executive, author and Certified Professional & Executive Coach.  As a CEO for CEO’s, Linda founded Trailblazer Advisors to catapult economic growth and leadership skills for business owners and senior management at any stage in the business lifecycle.  She believes that strong business leadership and entrepreneurism are the heart and promise of America. Linda is the President of the International Coaching Federation of Southern Arizona. 

Read the original article here:

http://www.insidetucsonbusiness.com/business_chatter/cyber-security-alert-there-are-only-two-kinds-which-one/article_993e8646-0d61-11e6-a13e-9bf1e63a7270.htmlscreen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am

screen-shot-2016-09-28-at-7-28-21-pm_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am Linking to Non-Regents Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Regents Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Regents Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Regents Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.

fbtwitterLinkedIngp

Nine Tips for Better Cyber Security

cyber4

Our Increasing dependence on information technology and networks has brought tremendous efficiency to our work and personal lives, but with these efficiencies come risks; particularly risks from cybercrime. According to an October 2014 independent study conducted by Ponemon Institute, the percentage of businesses impacted by malware and other kinds of cyber fraud is up 144 percent, and a survey by Experian↗ found that 60 percent of small businesses that suffer a cyber attack are out of business within one year due to the costs of customer notification, lawsuits, etc. Small and medium-sized businesses can be especially vulnerable since they often do not have the same level of resources as larger companies to defend their information technology systems and track their financial transactions on a frequent or daily basis. While protecting your business against cyber criminals may require a combination of special resources and a change in workplace procedures, here are a few basic steps that you can take at work and at home to reduce your risk of being hacked, spoofed, falling victim to computer viruses and Trojan horses or having your identity stolen.

  1. Keep your computer secure. Install and run anti-virus and anti-spyware and make sure you keep these up to date to protect against new threats. Use the latest versions of Internet browsers, such as Firefox, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer, and make sure your operating system and applications are updated regularly.
  2. Use a separate, dedicated computer for online banking – this decreases your chance of infection with malware because you are unlikely to encounter these programs on trusted banking sites. Do not use this computer for general web browsing and email.
  3. Never share usernames and passwords –use strong passwords with a combination of lower and upper case letters, numbers and symbols, and change your passwords if you suspect they could have been compromised. Use different passwords for the main applications you use. For example, your online banking password should be different than your email password.
  4. Use email safely. Don’t click on links within your email – instead, open your browser and search for the company that supposedly sent the link. Be cautious about opening attachments or downloading files from unfamiliar sources. These files can contain viruses or other software that can jeopardize your computer’s security.
  5. Don’t give out personal information over the phone or via email unless you have initiated the contact. Even if the email looks like it’s coming from someone you know, the person’s email may have been hacked.
  6. Never use unprotected Internet connections – In addition to using only secure connections, make sure websites asking for sensitive information are secure. These websites will show up in your browser with a lock icon in its toolbar that, when clicked, should display an info sheet, including the company’s name. Also, the URL should start with “https” instead of “http.”
  7. Educate your employees, family, housemates or anyone else who has access to your computer network and/or your financial information about cyber security best practices. You should also discuss monitoring account information and billing statements regularly for unauthorized charges and withdrawals.
  8. Do not keep your passwords on your computer in a Word document. While this practice is convenient for cutting and pasting and may protect against key logging software that can grab your keystrokes, this technique leaves the user vulnerable to clipboard loggers that capture the contents of the clipboard. Documents on your computer, even when password protected, are also vulnerable to skilled hackers. A better idea is to use a password manager program – some of which are free. PCMag.com offers an overview of these programs here.screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am
  9. Ask your bank what they are doing to assist you in cyber fraud prevention. At Regents Bank, our online banking platform offers tools, such as Trusteer Rapport,screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am which works alongside your current security software to add protection and decrease your susceptibility to criminal behavior, protecting you and your business from threats your antivirus cannot. We also offer features like Security and Transaction Alerts that can help clients protect themselves from fraud. Businesses using online banking also have access to security features such as dual control and user limits, along with Treasury Management products like ACH Fraud Protection, Positive Pay, and out-of-band authentication and secure access codes to protect ACH and wire transactions. And, we continually invest in back office resources to help detect potentially fraudulent transactions.

screen-shot-2016-09-28-at-7-28-21-pm_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-11-07-51-am Linking to Non-Regents Bank Websites

This icon appears next to every link that directs to a third party website not affiliated with Regents Bank. Please be advised that if you click this link you will be taken to a website hosted by another party, where you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of, the privacy and security policies of Regents Bank. We recommend that you review and evaluate the privacy and security policies of the site that you are entering. Regents Bank assumes no liability for the content, information, security, policies or transactions provided by these other sites.